Interview with Paula Giddings
QUESTION 19
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Tell me about the cultural things that were going in, the gospels singers were, and it was the first time they could be on campus and maybe some of the things that were going on with --

PAULA GIDDINGS:

So many things were now able to be expressed that we couldn't express before. Ah, Howard never liked, ah, Gospel Music, official, in the official way. And I remember a group of, of.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry. If you could say that again but tell me why.

PAULA GIDDINGS:

Ah, Gospel Music, where do we start?

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Say it again.

PAULA GIDDINGS:

What was the question?

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Howard never liked Gospel Music.

PAULA GIDDINGS:

Howard officially as, a, as with jazz, didn't like Gospel Music, it wasn't considered legitimate music. It was improper music. It wasn't the kind of thing that they thought that they should be, be teaching or allowing their young colored students to have. And, so I remember those, the, the great feeling of freedom during this period. There was a group of young women who would sing gospel songs, who would walk around the campus and perhaps pose at a tree and begin singing this wonderful, wonderful music. I remember in the Fine Arts building there had been this large portrait of a ballerina, of a White ballerina, ah, ah, in one of those positions, those dance positions, and someone had written beneath it, Wake up and live, you know. It was that whole, it was that entire sense of things, ah, that, that had changed. We had, we had created a sea(?) change in that university.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Cut.