Interview with Dorothy Graham
QUESTION 12
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Well, now, take me back to a particular, ah, holiday. You said in the pre-interview that you, around Thanksgiving, you had gone downtown to talk with city officials, something about their--

DOROTHY GRAHAM:

Yes, you didn't know when you had to get out, you see, you just were told. And then some people, they stopped taking your taxes so that they could, not garnishing, what do you say, they could say that your property wasn't worth anything, and this is how they, they, ah, kept you from getting any money for your property. We always put our rugs down for Thanksgiving dinner and put up the draperies. And, for the other holiday, would be, ah, Memorial Day, that's when you put up crisscross curtains and things of that sort and took up rugs. Well, this was a general routine for us, and my mother was afraid that we would not be able to spend Thanksgiving in our house because we didn't know when you were going to leave, nobody gave you any definite time that you would leave--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Stop down for a second--I need this answer


DOROTHY GRAHAM:

My mother--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Just a second, just a second, just a second, we have one more thing to do, I'm sorry.


DOROTHY GRAHAM:

My mother was afraid that we would not be able to have Thanksgiving dinner in our own home, so I took time off from school and I went downtown to find out about it, just when would we have to move, and I was told then that, oh, he didn't know, but I could ask Sofgee[SIC], that was the housing man, national housing me, and I went where they told me I could find Mr. Sofgee[SIC], and he told me, "We are coming through, just get ready for it, and you are in that line, but go back home and tell your mother that she can have dinner in her home this Thanksgiving, but I don't think she would be there for next Thanksgiving." So that meant that the rug company could bring the rugs that you had had in storage all summer and put them down and you could plan your Thanksgiving dinner. You, you don't know just what it feels like to be that uncertain, to have everything you've always had and cherished, and now you're not going to have it anymore, and you don't know where your going, you see. And this right of eminent domain, we need to go back to the drawing board, I think, and get some new rules and laws and regulations for that. If they would only give you enough money to move into alike circumstances, it would be all right, but to think that you got around eight or ten thousand dollars, and one lot would cost that much at the time that you're going to move, you see, and, and this is the way it works out.