Interview with Dorothy Graham
QUESTION 6
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

We're going to have to start one more time, he had, uh--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

OK, pick it up and do it again, Miller's Addition.

DOROTHY GRAHAM:

Miller's Addition was settled primarily by women who were widows. The house I lived in was very much like all of the others. Three bedroom house, and, ah, afterwards, about '24 or '26, in there, we did that house over, and it became a two-story house.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

We have to cut again, I'm sorry.



DOROTHY GRAHAM:

Miller's Addition was a section, I think, like, north of Fourteenth Street, and it ran up to about, maybe Twentieth Street, I'm not sure. And women lived there for the most part. Women without husbands because all the husbands were dead, I've never been able to figure that out. And there were a lot of grandchildren, and daughters, and sons. Where I lived, we had a very, at first, we had a very large yard, and then afterwards we built in there more houses for rental purposes. So, people who lived there had always lived there, whether they rented or whether they, ah, or whether they owned their homes. And, when I had to move from over there, I happen to now live in a section with the same people that I lived with across town. It just worked out that way. This house became vacant and they told me about it, and I ran out here for it.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Stop for a second.