Interview with Reverend Dana Greeley
QUESTION 17
INTERVIEWER:

YOU WERE BEGINNING TO TELL ME YOUR IMPRESSION OF KING AS A MAN, AND I WONDERED IF YOU COULD BACK UP A LITTLE BIT AND DESCRIBE YOUR FIRST MEETING WITH HIM REMEMBERING TO PUT HIS NAME IN THE SENTENCE FOR ME.

Rev. Dana Greeley:

Well, you know, I actually don't know uh, when my first meeting, I don't know now when my first meeting with Martin Luther King came. Uh, I uh, I, I do remember being enormously impressed by him and that was, that was sometime before Selma. Uh, a couple of times, I'm sorry to say I can't pinpoint it, but uh, in the earliest uh, period of course I admired him enormously. Uh, I admired him from start to finish for the depth of his convictions and uh, for his almost stubbornness in uh defending those convictions. Allow me to uh, go tangentially a little, but it wasn't tangentially for him, uh, to speak of Vietnam, because so much pressure was put on him to uh, confine himself to uh, the Civil Rights Movement. But I uh, admired him uh, uh immeasurably for his following his convictions wherever they went. And he was just as important, well I can't say just as important, but almost as important in the uh, peace movement, uh, therefore, as he was in the Civil Rights Movement. Uh, I think that perhaps it was uh, not until the uh, Washington March that I felt really well acquainted with him. Uh, his, "I Have a Dream" speech uh, although, uh, after that and especially when he uh, addressed a uh, a, a Continental Assembly that we had in Hollywood, Florida and we had the opportunity to entertain him and his wife afterward in our apartment that I felt more intimately acquainted with him, but uh, from the, from start to finish with the utmost unqualified admiration.