Interview with Reverend Dana Greeley
QUESTION 28
INTERVIEWER:

YOU GAVE ME A LITTLE BIT OF IT EARLIER AGAIN BUT I WANT MORE OF WHAT THE FEELING WAS AT THE MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR REV REEB. HERE WAS A MAN WHO HADN'T HAD MUCH TIME TO KNOW VERY MANY PEOPLE IN THAT COMMUNITY AND I HAVE THE SENSE THAT IT WAS QUITE SPECIAL THAT MEMORIAL SERVICE IN THE CHAPEL. COULD YOU GIVE ME A SENSE OF WHAT THAT LIKE?

Rev. Dana Greeley:

Well, uh, the memorial service for Jim Reeb I'd have to say was one of the high points in my life. Partly because, uh, of course, the uh, the cause that was represented uh, partly because of the participation of so many people uh, black and white together. It was a tremendous experience. Uh, a very good friend of mine was then the Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, Elliot Richardson, later became Attorney General of the United States and uh, Secretary of State and Ambassador to Britain. He wasn't known then, but I had the privilege of introducing him at that service, uh, to others and there was a great sense of a national impact I think both religiously and politically being made at that time. Well, uh, certainly it was important to me to realize later on that it made that impact at the White House, uh, and on the Congress and uh led to the important legislation that it did. The high point in the Civil Rights Movement, now there were others who were in a sense had been martyred as much as Jim Reeb was, but Jim Reeb, uh Jim Reeb's death seemed to be the climax and to occasion, uh both uh, in Selma the experience that all of us had, and in Washington the response that was elicited.