Interview with Lawrence Guyot
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

UM, CAN YOU TELL ME THAT UH—CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT THE SUMMER—THE ORGANIZING DURING THE SUMMER, AND UH… OH, NOT THAT SUMMER. THE ORGANIZING EARLIER, AND HOW YOU MET MISS HAMER, AND DID… WERE YOU IN WINONA WITH HER? CAN YOU TELL ME A LITTLE ABOUT THAT?

Lawrence Guyot:

Well, let me tell you. We—they were… I, I, I described the… the band of us, earlier, by this time Charlie Cobb had been added to that number. And we went to Amzie Moore's house, in Cleveland, Mississippi. Amzie, if there—other than Bob Moses, if there was one person who's responsible for the change brought about in Mississippi, it would have to be Amzie Moore. Because but for Amzie Moore being able to influence a local NAACP leader to invite Moses to Mississippi, he wouldn't have been invited. Had Moses not been invited to Mississippi, a lot of things would not have happened. I mean, there's just no question about that. But, once we were in Amzie's house, we were in the delta. We had made the conscious move not to participate in uh, lunch counter demonstrations. We were gong after the vote, because that's where the power was. The, the thing that has always fascinated me about the early history of Mississippi's organizing was that Mississippi is a state where politics is very immediate. I mean, there were… everyone, people who can't read and write can define most of the roles and duties of the Board of Supervisors, because they immediately impact on their lives. So our question was, once we had gotten over the question internally of whether or not we were going to register people who couldn't read and write, then we came out down on the position that people, regardless of whether or not they could read and write …

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS IS 15, MAY '79. BLACKSIDE. CIVIL RIGHTS. SOUND ROLL 8, CAMERA ROLL ELEVEN.