Interview with Lawrence Guyot
QUESTION 35
INTERVIEWER:

UM, OK TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT WINONA.

Lawrence Guyot:

Winona is a very simple case uh, of unbelievable horror and terror. Uh, Mrs. Hamer, a couple of other people were returning from a workshop. They stopped in Winona. They were arrested. When I found out that Mrs. Hamer was arrested I called over to the jail to find out did they have Mrs. Hamer. They said no, we don't have em, we don't have ‘em. I said well uh—then, then, then, then the sheriff came over and said, "Yes we have them, we got the niggers over here." I said well, you know uh, "What's the bond?" And uh, he said, "Well why don't you come over here and find out?" So I got some money and I went over there and tried to get them out and as soon as I was brought in I was beaten. I was taken into a room, beaten by eight people with guns, uh, a fire—-a fire was lit and then—-lit and pushed in the area of my genitalia. Uh, I was knocked out. A doctor was then brought in who tried to convince me to sign a statement that I had been drinking, I had been driving. I've never driven in my life. Uh, they didn't know that and -—that I had gotten into trouble while in Winona. I didn't sign any of this. Then the, the most significant thing about Winona to me is that if Roberta Galla hadn't kept calling the jail to ask for me I would have been dead. I would have been killed in that jail. But there were two things that happened. Roberta calling from New York and getting people to call from California wanting to speak to me because they were moving me from jail to jail and the fact that Medgar Evers was assassinated while I was in Winona. So the, the need to not remove me at that time was uh, something I didn't plan but I'm glad to be here.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

[unintelligible] CHANGING, 15 MAY '79, BLACKSIDE. CIVIL RIGHTS. THIS IS SOUND ROLL NINE, CAMERA ROLL THIRTEEN. SPEED. SECOND STICKS.