Interview with Patricia Harris
QUESTION 9
INTERVIEWER:

WE'RE GONNA HAVE TO—SORRY. UM, DO YOU THINK UH, WHAT KIND OF EFFECT DID UH, DID YOUR PARTICIPATION HAVE ON YOU?

Patricia Harris:

Um, let's see. Well, I'm sure like most of the black people feel, you know, very envious you know, toward the white people, ‘cause mainly you know, this is what the thing is about black and white, you know, gettin' together and workin' together and uh, sharin' things equally so, you know it had to have a, a big effect on me knowin' that uh, we were treated this way and why we were treated this way because we were looked upon as bein' you know, less than what the white man was, so… you know, it had an effect on me as wanting to really let them know that we are just as good as you are, you know and that things that you do we should be able to do ‘em also and that we shouldn't be ran over or discriminated against because of the color of our skin. But you know, as far as me wanting to get out, well I guess there have been times that I did want to get out and do some of the things that I had been told that were done to us, you know. I would have liked to have seen it happen to them, even though I never felt that myself… you know, would do it, but I've wanted to see it done. I would have loved to have seen it done to them, to let them see, you know, and feel some of the torments, you know, that we had to go through, you know. And just from bein' young and lookin' at it and seein' it happen, I, you know, would wonder, why is this happenin', why I mean, what happened to let it be this way in the first place, you know… what ever started the whole thing, you know. But like I say I always have wanted, that's the reason I fought with the movement and marched with them to, to see that things would happen to the white race like it did to us, you know, in order to get back at them for what they had done to us, you know. Just to see justice done, really.