Interview with Wendell Harris
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

AND, I GUESS WHAT I WOULD LIKE TO GET YOU TO TELL ME IS ABOUT, UM, HOW YOU THINK BIRMINGHAM IS A MUCH BETTER PLACE FOR IT.

Wendell Harris:

Sure. You know, I've been in this city for a long time and I really don't want to leave this city, I guess it's because I love it. But I also believe that this city is going to be a much better place than a lot of other cities in America and the reason for that is, the example I like to use when you were a child, and and your mother whipped you for doing something bad, you remembered your lesson. And you tried to get better because of it. In 1963, this city was brought to its knees. We were whipped to our knees because we were trying to hold onto something that we could not have. That something that was wrong. Something that we should change. And we were whipped to our knees. And when we rise back up, we get up on our feet and start to build again, as we are now. What we are doing is building with people. We're not building with white Wendell Harris, or a black or or a female or a male. We're building with people. Because we learned our lesson. And if you learn it well, then the people will talk to one another and you are able to move forward and I think, I think Birmingham, Alabama is going to be a better place because of what happened to us. Uh, some of these days they are going to put a statue up. Uh, to Dr. Martin Luther King. And I don't know if I will see it in my, my time. But my children will see it. Because he taught us a lesson. A lesson in how to have human relations among people. And that's what I think we're going to have here.