Interview with Luke Harris
QUESTION 1
JACKIE SHEARER:

Okay, so let's begin, in the mid-seventies you're an affirmative action student at Yale--


JACKIE SHEARER:

Okay, so, we're in the mid-nineteen seventies, you're an affirmative action student. I want you to tell me how you were perceived as such by faculty members, White students, other minority students.

LUKE HARRIS:

Can we start over?



JACKIE SHEARER:

Okay, so let's begin with your telling me what it was like being an affirmative action student in the 1970's.

LUKE HARRIS:

Okay. One of the big surprises for me, when I got to Yale Law School, was that I found that there was a difference in how students at Yale, faculty members at Yale, and for that matter, some administrators at Yale, related to Black students and other students of color; and, uh, this came as a great surprise to me, because it was a marked departure from what I'd been used to in college. Ah, in college I had, ah, worked very hard, and graduated number one in my department and looked very favorably upon going to Yale Law School. I had expected that what I'd find when I got there would be a superb student body, in general. But, also, in particular, that there'd be an excellent array of students of color there. And, when I got there, that's, in fact, what I found. What amazed me, however, was that the students of color were stigmatized in that environment. And, not only that, but, it seemed to me that there were a whole array of ideas that were connected to questions of affirmative action and questions of equality that really misconstrued. A whole lot of wrong-headed ideas, ah, seemed to be floating around the law school environment about what affirmative action was all about, and about how students of color fit into this whole process.