Interview with Casey Hayden
QUESTION 25
INTERVIEWER:

I'M SORRY… YEAH, OK, LET'S CUT. OK, WHY DON'T YOU START WITH THAT AGAIN JUST RESTATING THE TENSIONS.

Casey Hayden:

Well there were, uh, there were tensions between blacks and whites by now in the project, the uh, the local black staff who were sort of the backbone of the Mississippi Project had uh, had been dealing all summer with a lot of white, young white people who were uh, intellectual and moneyed, you know they were college kids, middle class, who had a lot of advantages and a lot of skills and uh, to some extent the black staff I think were threatened by them at some level and to some extent they were frustrated by having to put up with them all the time and be put in danger because of the visibility these people brought onto the scene. Um, so it's sort of a combination of fear and, I don't know, maybe jealously and also sense that this isn't quite what we wanted to be happening. Um, that came out in staff meetings around questions of, I mean it was ver-verbalized just like that, people were saying those things. At the same time though, you had the, the national SNCC organization um, which was I think threatened by what was going on in Mississippi…