Interview with Casey Hayden
QUESTION 40
INTERVIEWER:

OK LET'S, LET'S CUT. WHERE IS THE LEADERSHIP, WHAT, WHAT'S, WHAT ARE SOME OF THIS UH, SORT OF VETERAN SNCC LEADERS FEELING AT THIS POINT IN TERMS OF FRUSTRATION AND BEING EXHAUSTED AND AFTER THE SUMMER'S OVER WHERE …

Casey Hayden:

Well, after the summer was over there was of course the question of what to do next. Uh, it was difficult to talk about what to do next ‘cause the, the central office of SNCC was wanting some organization uh, of all these people who were there ready to work. So there were a lot of debates about whether to talk about hierarchy and structure, talk about what to do next. We talked about hierarchy and structure and set one up and kind of never got to what to do next. And part of what had came out of the um, all that frustration of what to talk about and what to do, included in that was the frustration that a lot of black staff people had felt in working with unknowledgeable whites who were sort of actually a little bit in the way and who might have been threatening or who might have been uh, dangerous to be with, so that a lot of, of, of feelings of hostility towards whites which were always there in the black community but had been subsumed and sort of uplifted by the nonviolent movement and the sense of spiritual superiority which the nonviolent movement and Dr. King embodied, uh, those feelings surfaced uh, around a sense of, you know black movement, you know, black power developed around communities. Uh, and the uh, convention challenge had a big impact on that of course too.