Interview with Tom Hayden
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

OK, TALKING ABOUT THE, THE SOUTHERN STUDENTS AND THAT, THAT MOVEMENT, CAN YOU BEGIN TO TALK ABOUT HOW, BEING MORE SPECIFIC IN TERMS OF WHAT KINDS OF CHANGES BEGAN TO START TAKING PLACE IN TERMS OF NORTHERN STUDENTS, WHAT KIND, WHAT DID IT REPRESENT TO THEM, THAT MOVEMENT IN THE SOUTH?

Tom Hayden:

Well, the movement in the South uh, represented uh, uh, the first great uh, student action in decades, and the first assault on the pillars of segregation in, in a hundred years by, by uh, mass action. And uh, it was very stirring, and, and uh, it mobilized a lot of conscience in the North. Uh, most of the students in the North were restless under their apathy and they wanted to do something and here was an opportunity. Some uh, started helping in the boycott by picketing uh, Woolworth's or Kreske's in the North and that had an effect. Uh, some, uh, became more involved in their own backyards in tutorial for kids in the, in the uh, slums in northern cities. Some uh, became involved in fundraising, send the money to SNCC or to uh, SCLC in the South. And gradually some started to make the commitment to go South. I was one of those. I wanted to be there uh, in the front lines.