Interview with Tom Hayden
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

NOW YOU, AT, AT THAT TIME, YOU, YOU FELT THAT THIS COULD ALL BE CHANGED WITHIN THE SYSTEM. UM, WAS THAT, TALK ABOUT THE STUDENTS AT THAT TIME AND THAT FEELING THAT THIS, THIS WAS A SYSTEM THAT COULD CHANGE, THAT COULD BEND, THAT COULD DO THE KINDS OF THINGS THAT YOU WANTED, THAT YOU FELT HAD TO BE DONE IN THE COUNTRY, AND UM, HOW THAT BEGAN TO CHANGE SOMEWHAT, ER, IF IT CHANGED AT ALL.

Tom Hayden:

Well, to what extent uh, it could be changed through the system was a c-I think a course of ongoing debate uh, within the movement and between generations of civil rights activists, between those who favored uh, nonviolent civil disobedience, those who favored voter registration, uh, those who favored alliances with the National Democratic Party. It was never finally settled, I think uh, uh, you'd have to be uh, a genius to tell what was the most important uh, method used, because in the end, it seemed to take uh, something of everything. Uh, but I think at the time there was a greater wellspring of hope and belief that if you acted, this system, with its commitment to democracy, would respond, uh, than there was say, five years later, when uh, many of us felt that the system had failed the test and uh, uh, we turned to more radical paths, or we felt more disillusioned uh, or we felt that uh, hope had been killed with the, the death of King and the Kennedys. There was a certain uh, springtime of idealism and great hope in the early 1950s.