Interview with Mary L. Hightower
QUESTION 44
JACKIE SHEARER:

And one last question, on, um, again, give me a sense of somebody who's coming from Mississippi and all the terrorism that you've met with, and why the Black agenda, national Black agenda, is important to you.

MARY HIGHTOWER:

Well, um, after leaving Mississippi and going to the convention, ah, leaving there, um, confused and leaving with very, ah, little hope of what we h- what we left behind, ah, going to the convention was--

JACKIE SHEARER:

I'm sorry. Rather than the hope, if you could just give me a sense of the intimidation and that kind of thing.

MARY HIGHTOWER:

In, in Mississippi during the time that the convention was organized, we were experiencing a lot of intimidation, we were experiencing opposition to our registering to vote and, ah, opposition to our electing Black people to office. And, leaving all of this and going to Gary, ah, we were, I was in hopes that we would find a way to, ah, eliminate this when we get back to Mississippi and, ah, to get, at Gary, a new sense of direction, a new leadership, and, ah, new directives to go back home and to really face this and to overcome it.

JACKIE SHEARER:

Let's cut. OK, is there anything that we