Interview with Howard Holland
QUESTION 12
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, if you could just tell me again about the worst thing you saw.

HOWARD HOLLAND:

Well, I guess the worst thing I saw was uh we were out one, ah, I believe it was a late afternoon, it was still daylight but not quite dark, and, ah, we had gone into this one store and it was uh--the front had all been burnt out, ah, Black from soot and, ah, obviously the, you know, firemen had already been there and there was water dripping, and we went in to search to see if there was anybody in there with the police officers and, ah, we went to the back and there was a store room or a meat locker or a cooler of some sort, and we opened it up and there was this guy just huddled up, you know, afraid that, ah, we had come back, ah, that we were there to do him some harm and, ah, he had said basically he'd lost everything, had lost his store and, ah, was probably considered, you know, what did they come back for, you know, I'm the only thing left here that I have, so--he thought we were more people coming in to do harm to his store or to his, to him or something. And we assured him that we weren't and we escorted him outside and uh--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Let me interrupt you, can you tell me one more time just very briefly, ah, not about your brother hearing about the, the riots, but just about your mom comparing the two of you.

HOWARD HOLLAND:

Oh, OK. Ah, my mother had a son in, in--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

--you had the chance to make a phone call.

HOWARD HOLLAND:

OK, I'll go back to all that. Ah, I had a chance to sneak a phone call out one time after the first three or four days we were there and, ah, most of us when we had the chance, called home to let our relatives and wives and mothers and fathers know we were OK. And my mother had, ah, ah, made an analogy, I guess, that uh - here she had one son in Vietnam at the time, and she was constantly afraid for him in Vietnam-it was a, a rough time, ah, `66, `67, ah, pre-Tet I war offensive and that--and she was always afraid that, you know, he wouldn't come back from war. And yet now, ah, ah, I went down to the city of Detroit and I was also, ah, she was thinking - here my other son is now getting shot at, he may be killed in his own home town, you know, there's a chance that he could come to harm and be killed, and it's in his own home town - didn't have to be in a war zone at the time. Ah, and she was worried all of a sudden, instead of one son, worried about two sons getting hurt or injured, or even killed, so uh--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, thanks. OK, cut. I think that's it, thank you very--