Interview with William Bradford Huie
QUESTION 13
INTERVIEWER:

OK, LET'S SEE. HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED IN THE TILL CASE?

William Bradford Huie:

I was in—I wasn't in Alabama when the trial was held. I came back—I was in California working on a film, I came back to my home here in Hartsill, oh, three or four months after the trial. And uh, I picked up Look magazine one night, and I looked at the letters written in, and somebody had taken this fact: it had been discovered by then. And that—-young Till's father had been killed during the Second World War and was a soldier. And so some uh, white boy out of Harvard-—a black man would never have done this—-some white boy out of Harvard had written a poem about the irony of young Emmett Till being killed in Mississippi while his father gave his life for the proposition "All men are created equal," etc. etc. Well, I looked at it, and I said, nonsense. It doesn't happen that way. I was in the Second World War, and most black men were stevedores. They were not where they would give their lives for the proposition that all men are created equal. So I had one of the strangest experiences in my life, one of the great coincidences in my life. When I had done the story of He Slew the Dreamer, three …