Interview with William Bradford Huie
QUESTION 27
INTERVIEWER:

DID YOU EVER THINK THERE WAS A CHANCE THAT THAT JURY WOULD HAVE UH, FOUND HIM GUILTY IN 1955?

William Bradford Huie:

He—if the truth had been told? Well, that's an iffy que—-there's no chance that that can, that that truth can ever be told to the jury under the but now, if, if that evidence had been presented to the jury, you would have had a hung jury in my view. There would have been some men on that jury who would not have found him innocent. They could not, if they were faced with such a brutal act, they could not have, they would, they would have voted to convict him. Just as the jury did in the castration case I imagine. And just as they'd done in other cases, and uh you'll find, you see, every black lawyer in the South at least then, particularly would tell you that when he had a black accused of a crime, he wanted white men on the jury, he didn't want black men to sit on, on, in judgment on his black client. Because white men didn't give a damn about one nigger killing another one. Therefore a white men would turn this black man loose for murdering somebody else. And they therefore the black lawyer would deliberately… uh, get, uh, want white men on the jury. But there were white men in Mississippi right then that if they were faced with evidence, such as we've, such as I later published, and of course this is what they resented, they resented the story, they resent it to this day, because I published the story as being an "approved" killing. That the community itself approved it, that Milam and Bryant thought that they were approved, that the fact that every attorney, uh, turned down and defended them without any fee from them, showed that they, that they had the approval of the community. And this is what uh, what people in Mississippi over there in the Delta hate me for today: it's for saddling the guilt on the community. Uh, and uh, but think of it, this is true, and uh, but uh, Milam was startled and he, as he told me, he simply thought that it was his duty at that time to make an example. We can't—if we don't do this right, we make an example of this one, then we can stop it from others. This is the way to stop what's an effort to change our way of life.