Interview with John Hulett
QUESTION 25
JAMES A. DeVINNEY:

We're going to put this on so that a national audience will see these shows and learn about Lowndes County. Is there some story that you've never had a chance to tell, that most people don't know about Lowndes County that you could tell us right now? Something that was really special about that time or the Lowndes County Freedom Organization?

JOHN HULETT:

Well, let me say this, number one, to have a Black--

JOHN HULETT:

There, there were no Black registered voters in this county in 1965, in February, not a single Black registered voter. And to have them, to come in, and to start registering folks to vote, that's really helpful, that's one of the key things. Number two, our kids, Black kids went to the worst schools that we had. And they was given the worst treatments, and they were not allowed to have the kind of equipment in our schools that the White schools had. They rode buses, and our kids had to walk to school. That was, something else that made a lot of changes into it. And, not only that, but it, began, things began to change all the way around with us, Black kids, who would finish school would be able to get jobs in this area, where they could not do it before. Teachers who taught school here in this area, many of them had to, if they bought an automobile, they had to buy it from a certain dealer. One of the men on the school board here, who had a car lot, and most people had to buy cars from that individual if you worked in the school system. So these were just some of the things that started changing when we, we were able to get our peoples in the school system. And today, and since that time we were able to have our own school board people who would look out for our kids and, and it's made a lot of changes since that time.