Interview with Jim Ingram
QUESTION 10
SAM POLLARD:

Take us back to Attica now and when you first went into D yard as an observer. What you saw and how you felt.

JIM INGRAM:

We went through a series of corridors.

SAM POLLARD:

Let's start again. One night when we were going toward D yard, we went through a series of corr--corridors.

JIM INGRAM:

When I entered D yard for the first time and accompanied with some members of the Fortune Society and this character Kenyatta, we went through a series of corridors, ah, that were lined with New York State Troopers and prison guards all giving us these hostile stares, what we call the "nigger stare", you know, that was common in the South. Ah, they would rack shells into the chambers of their weapons as we walked by which I knew was just a, a trick of intimidation because either you already got your weapon loaded and, and ready, or primed or its not and you don't wait until we walk by and we're not the enemy to do that so. We went through this series of tunnels and, ah, approached what they call the demilitarized zone where the State left us and we were then in the hands of the inmates. And the inmate guards there was a total dichotomy between the way that they behaved and the way these so called professionals behaved, I mean, there was a concern for our safety, ah, and we were led immediately to this tunnel where brother Shango who was from Detroit ran up and embraced me and began to tell me about how he had, he was instrumental in getting me there as one of the observers on the original list of demands. As I entered D yard I just had this great, ah, surrealistic sense of, ah, dreamlike quality, I mean I was enveloped by a dream. Everything was gray or Black. There seemed to be no colors except for the, the little pinprick fires that we're hearing about. Ah, 1200 men were out there along with the hostages. Over near the front, I came to the rear of D yard.

SAM POLLARD:

Stop.


EYES ON THE PRIZE II CAMERA ROLL 2047.