Interview with Jim Ingram
QUESTION 8
SAM POLLARD:

Lets start in from after you got out of jail, after you were released from Wayne County, where was it?

JIM INGRAM:

The 7th Precinct.

SAM POLLARD:

Right. Let's do it with, start with that.

JIM INGRAM:

After I was released from the 7th Precinct and went home. I'd gone through so much, ah, mental, emotional, and physical pain. The physical pain was nothing compared to the deep emasculation and sense of having been dehumanized while in that holding cell and while also in the shooting range in the basement. Ah, I was just totally filled with rage and, and, ah, a sense of, ah, deep and profound injustice to the extent that I felt that this whole thing had happened to me so that I personally could join others in trying to just wipe out the White race, that they had, I mean what they did was so incredible. Ah, to walk around and appear civilized, ah, you know by day and night and then under cover of the kind of, ah, ah, I guess you could call it darkness, being inside the station, they were doing all these incredible things to human beings. Ah, I just felt like the White race, should be wiped out and have no possibility of ever reproducing itself. So I thought that, ah, that's what I should do. Just try to kill as many of them as I possibly could.

SAM POLLARD:

Lets cut.