Interview with Jesse Jackson
QUESTION 13
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

We were talking about the Black Panthers and you were saying about Bobby Rush, Fred Hampton's best friend. REV.

JESSE JACKSON:

Bobby Rush, Fred Hampton's best friend, was being sought, he felt to be killed. They invaded the house where he was living. And I received a call early in the morning, one Saturday morning, that, ah, he was a fugitive and he was going to turn himself in to me before the people on the platform, ah, at our regular Saturday morning, ah, breadbasket meeting. And, by turning himself in to the police before several thousand people, that became his, his protection. Ah, I actually preached Fred Hampton's funeral and my sense was, it was in those first few days, the media was so anti-Panther it was as if their being killed was a kind of relief. Then the community realized that blood had been spilled, an assassination, and a massacre had taken place, and, and there is from the point of Fred Hampton's blood to Harold Washington's inauguration, a kind of straight line of indignation and dignity fighting insult. So Fred Hampton's assassination and Mark Clark, is very much a part of the equation of changing the politics of Chicago.