Interview with Jesse Jackson
QUESTION 15
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

One final question and not about the Panthers, about the Civil Rights Movement: What have we wrought? What has been the price that we've had to pay for what we've done in the Civil Rights Movement? REV.

JESSE JACKSON:

Well, we've started from further back than anybody else. After all the Constitution designates African descendants as three fifths human, no immigrant group had to face that mathematical equation, three fifths human, a little lower than people, a little higher than animals, 250 years of free labor, the interest from that, you know, would free us economically now. Another hundred years of legal apartheid, the segregation in this country. After all of this struggle, public accommodations, equal access and protection under the law as opposed to separate but equal. Now the right to vote, the most fundamental shift from slave ship en route to championship has been to be empowered, to be enfranchised with this right to vote. And I submit to you that in 1988, ah, I got more votes than Mondale got for the nomination in 1984. Within our lifetime, this ongoing struggle will have an African American, ah, as nominee of a Party. Indeed, as President of the United States of America and so the goal is, is within reach.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

OK stop down here.

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Thank you very, very much.