Interview with Jesse Jackson
QUESTION 17
HENRY HAMPTON:

The year is 1972 and the convention in Gary, Indiana is being planned for Black politics. REV.

JESSE JACKSON:

Let me say something about Gary within the context of Montgomery, Birmingham, Atlanta, Selma, Memphis, Gary. Gary was up south, it was up north. Gary was a city where an African American, Richard Hatcher had taken control, had won. I mean Richard Hatcher and Stokes were the first two urban mayors of, of this century. So he had the shift from southern focus to, to the north and you had a mayor who had achieved this. He could have a convention in his city. Ah, there was sense of dynamic all about that. But then there was a question, seven years after Selma, '72, what plans did we have to make Gary and Cleveland happen in Detroit and other cities across this country. So it was a, a great historical moment, a great sense of history, but also a, a sense of independent politics. It was not a democratic party convention. It was not Republican convention. It was a, a Black political convention that, ah, gave strength to, ah, Hispanics and women and workers and all those of who had marched previously in the Civil Rights Movement, they find Gary a certain reference point.