Interview with Jesse Jackson
QUESTION 22
HENRY HAMPTON:

In the latter part of '66, the word Black Power comes onto the political landscape-- REV.

JESSE JACKSON:

Black Power was presented-- REV.

JESSE JACKSON:

The connotation of Black Power in the media was violence. The fact is Black Power was power sharing. It was equity. Ah, White power was self evident, no one had to scream it out. White power was all White anchor people on the morning and nightly TV shows. White power was all White governors, all White senators. The mayor of every major city, White. Ah, so White power was self evident. And Stokely did two things. One by declaring that this is a quest for power and begin to call racism, racism. That disease on the soul of our country which has divided us for so long, ah, he talked about the need to have a share of power and that racism should not, should not stop it. And, I think at first Dr. King reacted to it because the media tried to make anyone who identified with Black Power as being a kind of leper. And finally Dr. King had to sit down and write and define Black Power. And he became maybe the most articulate, ah, spokesman and exponent of it and began to put it in some real perspective. Remember a group of Black churchmen in New York, ah, wrote a, a four-page ad in the New York Times just defining what Black Power meant and what White power meant.