Interview with John Jackson
QUESTION 8
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Did you ever hang out at the Freedom House?

JOHN JACKSON:

All the time--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

--Sure, tell us what it was like. By the way you're giving me some nice energy now. I really appreciate it, just keep it up, tell me what it was like.

JOHN JACKSON:

Well, meeting different people coming in to meet the civil right workers--and you meet all kinds of different students coming in, both Black people and White people were coming in to assist in different projects. They would sit up and discuss, ah, ah, the importance of us having the right to vote, and educating us to the point. And at the same time trying to find out what we really wanted to do. And that's what's most important about SNCC. They weren't the kind of students who--that organization, that Civil Rights organization wasn't one of the kind of organization that would go into a community and impose things on people. They would want--they would tell us, what was happening, try to educate us with what was going on. And then talk to us about things that we wanted to do. Did we think we should have the right to vote. Did we think we should fight in the armies, did we, did we think we should have better schools, or better buses, and that type of thing. And of course folks started responding. We do that at night, we'd sit around the Freedom House half through the night talking. Most of the time we were afraid, and watching for the Ku Klux Klan. So we would, be woke, we wouldn't be asleep, so we'd sit there twelve, one o'clock at night. Talk, about issues and those, kind, kinds of things.