Interview with Nancy Jefferson
QUESTION 1
JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK, you were talking the Soldiers Field rally and the excitement that you had at seeing Mahalia Jackson and also that it was a turning point for you, can you talk about that. I'm sorry if you could mention in my--could you cut a second. Sorry, One thing I neglected to say--



JUDY RICHARDSON:

If you can talk about the Soldiers Field and the sense of excitement and hearing Mahalia Jackson and that turning point you were talking point that you were talking about at Soldiers Field?

NANCY JEFFERSON:

Judy, that's uh--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Just, don't mention my name.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

That, ah,Soldier Fields rally was, was a great experience as I think about it, you know, it was a--it's, it's really hard to explain just how you felt about that because it was the height of the, of the Dr. Martin Luther King, it was the height of the excitement of him coming to Chicago to try t--kind of set things right. Um, it was, it was pleasing to know and see even though, ah,the mayor of this city was trying to, ah,thwart that, that operation of, of having that rally there, but there was enough people in Chicago that pushed forward. It was the Al Raby and the uh--Bill Berry[SIC] and that crowd, you know, of the--and, and people, ah,just made it so. And Mahalia Jackson sang that day as if she--as if the, the heavens were, were coming down on Soldier Field. But it was a hot day, it was just lots and lots of people, lots of us there, just there. Uh--you can, it's, you can't explain that feeling, you cannot explain, but you knew then that, that, ah,it was like um, things are going to change, ah,it, it must change. We, you felt that God was with us, ah,it was such an excitement that, ah,hard to explain. Ah, but I also think that what was done that day, ah,set the tone, the environment for a real movement in this city. I think that was, you know, that I, that was what happened.