Interview with Nancy Jefferson
QUESTION 19
JUDY RICHARDSON:

If you could go from that into--back to the marches and talk a little bit about Marquette Park and marching and that, and talk about how you returned and found all the cars overturned, and a sense--just very briefly about that march.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

Well you know, you still even connect that with the--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry, if you could--

NANCY JEFFERSON:

You can still connect Sorry, OK. You know, when the marches were how that, how that, the soldiers that was dispersed to the marches--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry, what I need is really the Marquette Park March.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

When we take Marquette park for instance, how does that relate to the other part of what we were doing? When we went to Marquette park on the housing issue, you know open housing issue that's what it was all about. An open communities act that's what it was all about, and that's what the war on poverty was doing was those different acts. And then when we was marching in Marquette Park, when we came back to our cars, our cars was turned, burning--our cars was burning. But that was allowed, that was allowed by the police department, that was part of this city that was part of Daley's machine. That was allowing those cars to be turned over and burned, and they looked the other way, they didn't protect the citizens over there that was marching in Maquette park that day. So those was the real acts of what Richard J, Daley was allowing to go on in this town, he was not serving and protecting the citizens right to go marching out there.