Interview with Nancy Jefferson
QUESTION 6
JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK, talk about how he pitted the machine, pitted Blacks against Blacks.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

Well, I--it, when Daley, how Daley was very cleverly um, was doing, just putting.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK, if you could just start it over again.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

Yeah, lets start.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

OK.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

Richard J. Daley was a very clever politician, you know with machine politics, he was a mastermind at it, and how he--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

That's a great beginning, lets start over one more time.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

Richard J. Daley was a mastermind at machine politics, he was clever, he knew that, you know, he denounced all the time Martin Luther King coming to Chicago, they called him a carpet bagger, ah,"he should stay in the south" and all this, um. He took, um, first of all he co-opted very smart mind--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Do you mind if you could you say, Richard Daley co-opted minds.

NANCY JEFFERSON:

At first of all Richard Daley co-opted smart minds, of the young Black men particularly, into his camp, so that he could control the others of grassroots people. They were the Erwin Francis, and all those folks, very smart, articulate people. Ah, he co-opt us by putting them in his camp and they became, and wi-with the programs, of, of, of all the social programs that were: they were became the heads of those programs. We became the contractors of those programs: the grassroots people. Ah, he did it for two things, Mayor Daley did it for two reason, so that Blacks could spy on Blacks. Those that were, were coming out with, ah,potential activist such as the Nancy Jeffersons. I got a file knee deep, you know the Red squad, you know we finally got those files, you know. And, ah,it's knee deep, it's how they were following me all the time, and I was only talking about, ah,independent politics and all that stuff.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry could you pause just a second. I'll tell you what I'm looking for particularly.