Interview with Erle Johnston
QUESTION 4
INTERVIEWER:

OK, NOW, I'M TRYING TO GET A SENSE OF, RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BLACKS AND WHITES IN THE SOUTH, A LOT PEOPLE SAY THAT EVEN THOUGH THERE WAS THAT CODE OF RACIAL SEGREGATION OR SOCIAL SEGREGATION IN ONE SENSE THAT BLACKS AND WHITES HERE HAD A CLOSER RELATIONSHIP THAN THEY DID MOST ANY OTHER PART OF THE COUNTRY.CAN YOU DESCRIBE THAT A LITTLE BIT? WHICH PART DO YOU THINK IS TRUE?

Erle Johnston:

Well, having lived so long in a, a small city, where we meet and mingle and work with blacks all the time, even back in those days, in fact I've heard a, a Yankee [unintelligible] wonder where does the line start and where does it end because of the fact that we were mingling together. And consequently I think to, to most of us had more feelings for the blacks than somebody who didn't ever see them at all, like in the big cities in the South, for instance. But we had a very good relationship in [unintelligible] where I live and I think in most of the cities in Mississippi.