Interview with Arthur Johnson
QUESTION 10
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, stop for a second. I want to keep going with that. Can you talk about that in the--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

--so think if you could just give a sense of the growing--

ARTHUR JOHNSON:

I think by the second day of the riot there was a great desperation among all the people in town who had any sanity left about this--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

I'm sorry to stop you It was the first day still so if you could just start with the sense of fear and don't put a date to it--

ARTHUR JOHNSON:

OK. The growing sense of, of, of concern in the community was that the situation was out of hand, that no one knew where it was going, when it would end, or even how to end it**. And I think the great fear among many Blacks was that to, to, call on federal troops, ah, to put and end to this would carry with it the high risk of considerable bloodshed. And I think there were some people who were concerned about this. Though I felt, and I know that Judge Keith felt that, that had to be done if this was to be stopped.