Interview with Karima Jordon
QUESTION 15
LOUIS MASSIAH:

Great. Good. How was the strike, you were an eighth grader, or were a ninth grader by then.

KARIMA JORDON:

Eight and ninth grade.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Eight and ninth, how was the strike affecting your plans? How was that affecting your studies?

KARIMA JORDON:

Well, we missed, the strike affected our studies because we missed a lot of school. Ah, we did take, we still were responsible for the Res- Regents Exams. But you didn't see any further than what was happening then, because, ah, what was happening right then, during the teacher's strike was telling you that no matter what you did as a Black kid, it really didn't matter. So, I really don't remember any aspirations from that point to the next point. I knew I had to go to high school. I remember getting my final report card home in the mail. Ah, very few classes did I go to really. There weren't any. There really wasn't a formal school. So we really didn't have, there was just too many in, interruptions to have school. Your school was what's happen, was happening in the community. Every single day was a new day, was a new thing. You didn't know what to expect and that happened every day.


LOUIS MASSIAH:

I'm also going to ask you again. I don't know if we'll have a chance on this roll but we'll try it.