Interview with Karima Jordon
QUESTION 1
LOUIS MASSIAH:

When did you first begin to think yourself as an American of African ancestry? You're first sort of consciousness of being and African American?

KARIMA JORDON:

When I was in fifth grade and I had my first Black teacher, ah, that's Mr. Sorese[SIC].

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Could you just make sure you rephrase it as a question.

KARIMA JORDON:

OK, the first time, I, ah, really realized that I was an African American not a Negro American was when I was in the fifth grade, ah, I had a Black teacher named John Sorese[SIC] and he would tell us that we were not Indians. We were not Negroes. We were African-Americans. Caused a lot of controversy with my grandmother who went up to school and told him, I was not an African-American, I was a Indian, but, ah, he convinced me I was African-American.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Can we stop for a second.


LOUIS MASSIAH:

Remember to rephrase the questions.

KARIMA JORDON:

OK.


LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK, once again, when did you first begin to think of yourself as an American of African ancestry? When did you first think of yourself as an African American?

KARIMA JORDON:

The first time I thought of myself as a African American was when I was in the fifth grade and I had my fist Black teacher, John Sorese[SIC] who told us we were not Negroes, because Negroes didn't come from anywhere. We were not Indians because our cheekbones weren't high enough. And we were African. And he told us we were African Americans. It caused a lot of controversy between him and my grandmother but he convinced me I was an African American.