Interview with Karima Jordon
QUESTION 20
LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK. You had a number of new African American teachers in the schools then. Some people have said that these teachers were teaching hate. Was that true?

KARIMA JORDON:

Did these teachers teach hate? They didn't teach hate. They didn't have to teach hate. Ah, the police, the UFT teachers, the media, how they reported what was going on, they taught us that, not to hate, but they taught us that, ah, we weren't worth anything. What the Black teachers did do was to broaden us, our perspective of looking at things. We were no longer members of the small community called Ocean Hill-Brownsville. We were broadened to W.E.B. DuBois, his readings, Langston Hughes, Malcolm X, ah, Marcus Garvey, ah, ah, H. Rap Brown, ah, ah, Mao Tse-Tung, The Red Book. I mean we became international and it was a good thing because Black people are the Third World. The Third World is much larger than European history**. They brought us back to ancient, ancient African history, I mean ancient world history which didn't any longer start at Rome. It started with the Benin society, it's smelting of ore and silver and gold and things of that sort. Ah, we became much larger than just the community and, till today, when I look at things, I look at it from an international perspective. And that was what those teachers taught us. They, hate was like, that was the least, I mean, why worry about hate?

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Great.

KARIMA JORDON:

It wasn't--