Interview with Karima Jordon
QUESTION 8
LOUIS MASSIAH:

All right. Fall of '68, that's when the big strikes were going on, what was it like going to school? Could you talk about, you know, how your day began.





LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK, fall of '68, what was it like going to school then? Could you describe your morning and what you saw in and around that Junior High School 271?

KARIMA JORDON:

I was totally amazed to know, get up in the morning, walk, meet my friend Cia. We get to school and first thing, on the block is the school on Howard, We came in from the Howard side, Howard Avenue side, and, ah, we had to go through barricades to get to the school and we'd look upon on the rooftops, across the street from school, the cops were with their helmet gear and riot, their riot helmets and their night sticks and helicopters and, and the playground was converted into a precinct and walking up to the school you have just mass confusion. You have the community people out there. You have the UFT. You have the Black teachers on the inside. It was, you were just amazed. You couldn't believe this, this was happening, you know and you just went to school.**