Interview with Nicholas Katzenbach
QUESTION 16
INTERVIEWER:

WOULD YOU START OVER AGAIN. AND UH, GIVE ME A STATEMENT.

Nicholas Katzenbach:

When the ‘64 Civil Rights Act was passed, uh, and he was very instrumental in helping the senate with that, uh, President Johnson was. Uh, he then wanted more and I think most of us, I know it was true of me thought uh look, lets have breathing period, let's have a little bit of rest, to get this through the house or the senate was, was really an enormous legislative accomplishment, to get cloture on civil rights was the first time in history. We did it. We did it with about 3 votes to spare and uh, I felt let's, let's have a rest. Johnson said no, he wanted to go ahead, he wanted more and uh, and so we ended up with more. I must say that uh, we got more, the Voting Rights Act uh came and uh that was enormously helped by the, the uh attitude of the political authorities in, in uh, in the South. I've often felt that uh, the behavior of Sheriff Clark in Selma was the catalyst for getting the Voting Rights Act through the Congress.