Interview with Nicholas Katzenbach
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

I'M SORRY WE'VE JUST RUN OUT.

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM:

[Ok, that was a rollout on 583, we're going to 584.]

Nicholas Katzenbach:

This meant essentially that you had to bring separate law suit for each person who was discriminated against, and there were thousands. It would take years to accomplish that, to get, to win that case, and to get them registered to vote, uh, and it simply was not solution to the problem. Uh, indeed, uh, it would take so long, as I remember it did at Selma, that when we won a whole bunch of voting cases in Selma, we went back and the same court that had denied it initially said well it was six or seven years since the first cases had been brought, he thought the situation might have changed, so we'd have to reprove the whole pattern of discrimination in voting again. So we felt that there was nothing that could be done so long as there was a literacy test at all, and so long as that literacy test, uh, or any test uh, was going to be administered in a, in a blatantly discriminatory way, and that was why we needed to have legislation in those areas where uh, that discrimination had existed.