Interview with Nicholas Katzenbach
QUESTION 28
INTERVIEWER:

SO IF YOU CAN KIND OF TALK TO HUMPHREY'S …

Nicholas Katzenbach:

Yeah, uh, after the election in ‘64, when Hubert Humphrey became vice-president, uh, one of the things that I wanted to urge upon President Johnson was that Civil Rights not continue to be simply a responsibility of the Department of Justice bringing lawsuits and things of that kind, when there were lots of things that the Department of Justice bringing lawsuits and things of that kind, when there were lots of things that the Department of HEW as it was then, uh, Health, Education and Welfare, agriculture uh, and uh, other areas of the government could do things to help civil rights, so I had suggested that the President make uh, Vice-president Humphrey a coordinator of uh, all of these programs, uh, and he did that. He did that with some reluctance. Uh, uh, I don't know the reason for the reluctance whether it was uh, uh, that he felt uh, that the Vice President would run away with it in some way and uh, or that it was being done because uh, people didn't have confidence in him with respect to Civil Rights, uh, but he did it, and as a result of that, uh, Humphrey would meet with the black uh, uh leaders from time to time and uh, met with Dr. King and uh he would listen to them very sympathetically, he'd had a long history of sympathy with Civil Rights causes, more than that, actively supporting them.