Interview with Helen Kelly
QUESTION 11
SAM POLLARD:

OK, that's good.

Now after all this was over Mrs. Kelly, did you think that the riot accomplished anything? Did you see Detroit in a different way? Did you think it was different after the riot?

HELEN KELLY:

Well, people realized they hadn't, ah, done what they should have done with the community but, ah, I don't see where it accomplished that much myself because you couldn't buy a gallon of milk nowhere around in the neighborhood 'cause everything was closed up or burned down, so, uh--

SAM POLLARD:

If you could just tell me that one again, but just include, "People thought that after the riot," I need the word "riot" in your answer.

HELEN KELLY:

They would do what?

SAM POLLARD:

I just need to have you say "riot" in your answer, the word "riot." People thought that after the riot, that nothing had been accomplished, whatever you feel, however you felt.

HELEN KELLY:

But you asking me, did the--

SAM POLLARD:

I'm asking you how you felt, I just need the word--

HELEN KELLY:

Oh, how I felt?

SAM POLLARD:

Yes, I'm asking, I just need the word "riot" in your, in your answer.

HELEN KELLY:

Oh, well, as I said before, I don't see where the riot accomplished nothing myself but a lot of burned up buildings and no, people don't have no, some of them lost their homes, so I can't see where it accomplished that much, but I, one thing I do know, that the people, ah, that they couldn't buy a loaf of bread or a quart of milk nowhere in the neighborhood, after those riots was all over.

SAM POLLARD:

OK, let's cut. OK.