Interview with Coretta Scott King
QUESTION 35
INTERVIEWER:

—OF HOW YOU FELT, WAS BIRM—HIS GOING OFF TO BIRMINGHAM, DID THAT SEEM A PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS TIME?

Coretta Scott King:

Birmingham was very difficult for many reasons, from a personal standpoint. Basically, I was in a situation with four children, Martin was in jail. I did not even have regular household help. I had temporary volunteer help and four children and my husband in jail and it was—it was really a problem here in Atlanta, because in Montgomery I had, we had gone through a struggle together, and even though this was home, people didn't react the same way. It was, everybody was preoccupied with Montgomery. I mean, it was, it was a way of life. I mean for a whole year we boycotted—more than a year—the buses, before the desegregation took place. So in Montgomery, here we were, in a situation, soon after we arrived, and there was not much help coming forth from people just...we had a volunteer church member, to help, and that was difficult for me. The difficulty of understanding what was going to happen, I knew that, I was prepared for it.