Interview with Coretta Scott King
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT ATTRACTED YOU BOTH TO MONTGOMERY? YOU WERE RETURNING TO THE SOUTH. HOW DID YOU FEEL ABOUT THAT?

Coretta Scott King:

Well, we were attracted to the South. Not necessarily to Montgomery initially because we both had a commitment to return to the South, and to work in the South to try to bring about some changes in the situation of segregation and the, the lack of dignity and respect that, among—from the black, white community toward the black community. Montgomery happened to be the place, because Martin was invited to, to the pastorate of that church, Dexter Avenue, and when he got the invitation, he said, "This is the kind of church that I would like to begin my ministry in, because the congregation is an enlightened one, and I can preach the way I want to, and continue to develop in my ministry." Most of the people in the Dexter, in the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church had at least college education, more than ninety percent, and many of them were college professors. As a matter of fact, we had about eight or nine Ph.D.s in our congregation, so that, that the people who were in the church were the kind of people who could appreciate a young Ph.D. just out of seminary, with a lot of idealism and so on. Martin's idealism, of course, I think became a combination of idealism and practical reality, I guess, bringing the reality and the idealism closer together as he moved over that first year and into what was to come to be the destiny of his life.