Interview with Coretta Scott King
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

THAT'S WONDERFUL. THAT'S VERY VIVID. CAN WE STOP FOR A MOMENT?

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

OK, the sound is from the air conditioning also. The construction is gone now.

Coretta Scott King:

Segregation was a way of life in the South, and the South we returned to in Montgomery was the South pretty much as we left it. And if you were a person who was educated, lived in a black community, your living, where you lived, usually, you were segregated from whites. You'd—and if you worked as a professional, you worked in your own institutions. You didn't have to encounter whites a lot, except when you go downtown and go into the stores. If you, most of us had cars, so we didn't have to ride the buses. It was the masses of people, the working people, who had to ride the buses. So one could avoid a lot of the day-to-day humiliations if you were so-called middle class, 'cause we had, as I said, separate, our separate lives. We had our own community of, of professionals and so forth, which was very small, but it was there, nevertheless. So you didn't have to encounter it. Martin and I, therefore—