Interview with Coretta Scott King
QUESTION 20
JACKIE SHEARER:

So, do you remember any feelings you had as you stood there up on the stage next to Mrs. Betty Shabazz. And I'm wondering if you also wonder--think that it was any coincidence that this gathering happened in the last year of Nixon's first term in office.

CORETTA SCOTT KING:

I think I may have met Betty Shabazz at another time, but, ah, the fact was that we were there together and I certainly had not really had that much contact with her. Ah, I think the fact that we were there together, ah, at least, presented a, ah, some semblance of, of unity. Ah, unity that doesn't mean uniformity, ah, and, I think that sent a message to, you know, to the American people--ah, Black people and White people alike. Ah, I think that, ah, the overall, ah, significance of, of, of that coming together, ah, said to, ah, us that, you know, we can, together, do a lot more than we can being separated and divided. Not that there was not some, ah, divisions within the group at that particular time. But, I think it was a very forward step on working on bringing the Black community and the Black leadership together in a kind of a family, leadership family relationship. Not that we have fully achieved that. But, I don't think we've attempted anything since then, like that of that magnitude.



CORETTA SCOTT KING:

--gave him the Martin Luther King Non-Violent Peace Price?