Interview with Bernard Lafayette
QUESTION 22
JUDY RICHARDSON:

How did, how did the Daley machine play into that in terms of pitting on Black, Blacks against Blacks?

BERNARD LAFAYETTE:

And one of the things you found that, ah, in the, ah, Daley machine, that you had Blacks against Blacks. There was not a sense of unity, and the color lines meant nothing in that regard because you would find, ah, as many conservative Blacks as you would find ah, conservative, ah, you know Whites who also participated in many ways in helping to perpetuate the system that exist. And it seemed that many times people were simply out for themselves, were not willing to make the kind of sacrifices that it would take in order to, ah, make the, the kind of changes. There were Blacks who had gotten into positions of power, but instead of using that power to bring about changes in the community, to help many of the other Black people, they simply, ah, used that power to, ah, help themselves. And the reason they did that, we understood, because they too felt a sense of hopelessness and sometimes, ah, people feel that when they cannot help the people, then they simply help themselves.