Interview with Lonnie Lawrence
QUESTION 15
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

So what did you do next?

LONNIE LAWRENCE:

Well, I guess, you know, things began to start to happen. It began to draw a lot more publicity about what had happened, what had occurred, you know, because his death actually occurs sometime, occur--occurred after the actual beating occurred, um, I found myself in a very difficult situation because I, I found myself being an official spokesperson for the department, but trying to deal with a fact that here was a person who was a very good friend of mine, who I grew up with, who I knew very well, was the victim of, of this police brutality. It made it very difficult to, to, to balance that. And, to the point where I, I, I made some statements, um, speaking on behalf of the department and everything else, but I also made some statements to, to some folk relative to how I felt about what had occurred. It was very difficult, you know, real difficult because, you know, it, you know, and I guess people say, "Well, you know, you, you, you, you should, you should be oblivious to those kind of things," but, it's difficult to be oblivious to those kind of things, particularly when it's a person, someone that you know very well, and, and, and all things point to the fact that, um, there was something wrong done.