Interview with Lonnie Lawrence
QUESTION 2
MADISON DAVIS LACY:

They talk a lot about Overtown in its heyday. Tell me what it was like growing up there, man.

LONNIE LAWRENCE:

Well, I'll tell you, it was not compared to anything, I don't think, I think--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

Start over again, try to give me a statement, you know, "Growing up in Overtown," you know, get Overtown in there.

LONNIE LAWRENCE:

OK. Growing up in Overtown was different from anything else that you could probably even imagine. And I guess because, you know, it was like family, you know, everybody was like family. There was so much togetherness, so much, um, everything there was like, was, was like, like close-knit**, you know, the schools, you know, you knew everybody, everybody did everything basically together, you know, running around the streets, you know, and, and enjoying all the little things that were associated with Overtown. You know, when you look at the fact that, that, um, what we called the shotgun shacks were, were important to us. And I think about Overtown now and, and the little shotgun shack I used to live in is I-95. I-95 went right, straight through it. And we call them shotgun shacks because, you know, they're wooden houses, but you could stand--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

We gotta stop, we rolled out. We rolled out



MADISON DAVIS LACY:

All right, start again and tell me about shotgun shacks.

LONNIE LAWRENCE:

Well, you know, your shotgun shacks, you know, the reason they were called that was because you could stand outside a shotgun shack and, and really look right through because, you know, the, the, the, ah, the wood, you know, sort of sit up and you can see in the house from standing outside. And that's why they called them shotgun shacks, you know, anybody could take a shotgun and blow a hole in something and you can see right through it. And, um, you know, we had all kinds of little, little, little things over there, you know, and, um, one of the things that, ah, was Good Bread Alley, which was really lined with shotgun shacks. And most of them were smaller, you know, um, I lived in a two-story one, but when you looked at Good Bread Alley, people said, "Why do you call it Good Bread Alley?" Well, Good Bread Alley was called because it was good, ah, and it was the kind of place where everyone broke bread together, basically, and shared a lot, you know, there was a lot went on in there, um, and it was just a good feeling with people living and being in Good Bread Alley, and that's basically one of the reasons why it got its name as Good Bread Alley. You know, there's so many things that, you know, you can think about and talk about Overtown, you know, going back to, to, to, to the Orange Blossom Classic days when, when people used to step out, you know, I mean, you know, that was a time to get out the, the rabbits and, ah, and all those little fuzzy things and put around your neck to go to the Orange Blossom Classic Parade. Um--

MADISON DAVIS LACY:

OK, we've got roll out. Now we're starting on a full roll