Interview with Marcia Webb Lecke
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

I THINK YOU SAID TO US SOMETHING ABOUT BEING CHILDREN OF THE 50S, NOT SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS. I WONDER IF YOU COULD TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THAT.

Marcia Webb Lecke:

You know, sometimes when we look back, we give a different perspective to the way things were than maybe they really were. When we watch Happy Days, and some of us don't recognize Happy Days as being part of our lives, and yet, maybe, maybe it was rather accurate. We children of the fifties didn't have causes, like the young people of the sixties did. And we di— didn't question the authorities as much, so that if they told us to do certain things, and we did what we were supposed to do. I know I have a sister, who, who grew up in the sixties, and she was one who was involved in every causes, marched on Washington, wrote letters, and did all sorts of things in an activist way. And I think interestingly enough, my, my son who just graduated from college was a little concerned that during his college years, that young people his age didn't have a cause. And he was a little concerned that some of their misplaced values. And I think it's interesting that on the college campuses, just today, that South Africa is becoming a cause for some of the young people. And I think they're hungry for one. I wish we had recognized ours.