Interview with Jerris Leonard
QUESTION 20
LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK, we talked earlier about how, how early on you had some sense that there would be no indictments and also that at, at some point that you let it be known to the judge that you had no intention of, of handing down any indictments. Could you talk a little bit, why?

JERRIS LEONARD:

Well, I, it became fairly clear to me, ah, I don't recall exactly when, but certainly midway, maybe two-thirds of the way into the Grand Jury investigation that we were going to have a very difficult time, um, ah, with the narrow federal criminal statute by way of bringing an indictment and getting a successful conviction. I let it be known at that time that I was, um, not very happy with the fact that Hanrahan's office had indicted the Panthers in the very same activity, and, I think it's fair to state that I let it be known that, that, ah, we might look favorably on something other than indictments if the, if the state indictments against the Panthers were dismissed. Ah, I, I refused to admit, and I would deny that I made a deal with them, but I certainly let that be known.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

If you could just say that again and say indictments of police or law enforcement--

JERRIS LEONARD:

I certainly let it be known that if the indictments against the Panthers by the state prosecutor were dismissed that we would not seek indictments against the police officers and the police, and the city officials and Hanrahan in the Grand Jury case.