Interview with Rufus Lewis
QUESTION 34
INTERVIEWER:

WHEN KING'S HOUSE WAS BOMBED, YOU SAID HE DIDN'T LIVE TOO FAR FROM YOU, HOW WAS THAT – HOW DID THAT EFFECT THE PEOPLE IN THE BOYCOTT – THE BLACK PEOPLE WHO WERE SUPPORTING HIM.

Rufus Lewis:

When King's house was bombed, it – it affected the whole black community, because they – they – they acted as though their house was bombed, and crowds of people gathered right down the street here, where he lived, soon as they heard it, it was a mass of people in the streets. That's the way they responded to him. Now, King had to come out to tell them, that his wife and children were safe, and they could go home. But they didn't respond to that, they – they wanted to do something to – to make amends, for for someone bombing his house or, bomb somebody else's house, because his was bombed. That was the way they felt. But he quieted them down, and told them that nobody was hurt. His children were well, his wife was not hurt, he was not hurt, and later on, during the night, they gradually went back home.