Interview with Leo Lillard
QUESTION 16
INTERVIEWER:

OK, WHAT WE'RE GOING TO DO IS WE'RE GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MARCH. AND GIVE ME AN IDEA OF WHAT, OF THAT MARCH COMING TOGETHER AND WHAT IT MEANT.

Leo Lillard:

The morning that, uh, Looby's house was bombed, um, it was clear that the racists in the town were out to get a symbol of the movement. They couldn't get a student because they had already beaten us up, that wouldn't work, so they decided to attack an adult symbol and what this did unknowingly, unwittingly, it worked into uh, into the, to the benefit of the movement because once you attack Looby, a pillar of the community, a councilman, uh, a professional adult – what that did was that then sent a signal to Nashville as a whole that no longer is it just going to be a student only movement. That the adults, uh, the professors, the workers, uh, the teachers uh, all the spectrum of Nashville had to make some physical presence shown on that march. Now the march itself, of course, was something that was put together instantaneously. We had many spontaneous, uh, events to take place, but I think the march itself following Looby's house bombing was uh, was very gratifying because not only was it spontaneous, but it had quantity for, for a change. Often times, we would have to cajole people to come down, um, convince them, but in this case the march didn't need that, the march sent a signal - we must all put our bodies on the line—it's no longer just a student—it's no longer just an out of town set of, set of intellectuals where they belongs to everybody, everybody has no choice at this point. We've got to come downtown and yet it did still, it was orderly, it was silent, it was well put together, uh, there was no altercations, no incidents, nobody got run over by cars and we went to the place where we knew we had to be. We had to be at at the seat of the government; we had to take over the government; we had to demand the government come and address us and that's exactly what happened.